Chesapeake College Alcohol and Drug Use Policy

Ban against alcohol and drug use

Unauthorized possession, use, sale, or distribution of alcoholic beverages or of any illegal or controlled substance is prohibited by the Chesapeake College Student Code of Conduct. (Section 3-I, Non-Academic Misconduct). These prohibitions cover any college-sanctioned off-campus activities as well as on-campus events.

Legal sanctions

Chesapeake College students could face legal sanctions for violating local, state or federal laws against possession, use, sale, or distribution of illegal or controlled substances, or underage possession, use, sale or distribution of alcoholic beverages. Laws and possible sanctions vary by jurisdiction, but could include probation, community service, fines, and/or incarceration.

Health risks associated with use of alcohol and other drugs

Below are some of the health risks associated with the use of alcohol and other drugs.

Alcohol

  • addiction (particularly for individuals with alcoholism in their families)
  • every drinking episode results in some irreversible damage to brain cells
  • fetal alcohol syndrome (birth defects caused by women drinking during pregnancy)
  • increased risk of cirrhosis, ulcers, heart disease, injury by accident, cancer of mouth, esophagus, liver and stomach
  • blackouts
  • development of personality disorders
  • increased tendency to abusive behavior
  • impaired judgment may put individuals in life-threatening situations
  • loss of inhibitions
  • malnutrition and resultant damage to muscle, bone and other tissues
  • circulatory impairment
  • depression of central nervous system function
  • increased effect of narcotics/tranquilizers when used together
  • alcohol poisoning leading to possible coma and death

Marijuana

  • psychological addiction depending on patterns of use
  • stored in body fat for 4-6 weeks
  • disruption of brain function is caused by a motivational syndrome (loss of energy and enthusiasm including short-term memory loss and impaired depth perception and time/space orientation)
  • lung damage due to tar and other chemicals
  • increased heart rate
  • increased appetite which can lead to weight gain
  • idiosyncratic constriction of air passages in lungs of asthmatics
  • disruption of reproductive organ function in men and women

Stimulants (Ephedrine, Crystal Meth, Crack, Cocaine, Ritalin, etc.)

  • extremely addictive
  • development of overwhelming compulsion to repeat use (with "crack" cocaine)
  • central nervous stimulant
  • increased heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure
  • possible death-producing fibrillation of the heart
  • possible death-producing seizures and strokes
  • impaired judgment
  • anxiety, apprehension, hyperactivity, impulsiveness, exhaustion, delusional thinking
  • increased tendency of abusive behavior

Hallucinogens (LSD, PCP, mushrooms, Ecstasy)

  • paranoid thoughts, anxiety, panic, depression
  • delusions, time and visual distortions
  • depersonalization
  • extreme suggestibility while under the influence of the drug
  • intensification of any pre-existing psychosis
  • ataxia (unsteady gait/balance problem)
  • impaired memory
  • alteration of electrical activity of brain
  • changes in levels of brain chemicals

Inhalants - a diverse group of chemicals, including solvents, aerosols, gases, and volatile nitrites

  • depression of the central nervous system, which can lead to death from a single use
  • psychologically and physically addictive
  • headache, muscle weakness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, nosebleeds, tremors
  • heart, lung, kidney, and liver impairment/damage
  • brain and nervous system damage and paralysis

Heroin

  • prolonged psychological dependence
  • rapid tolerance and physical addiction
  • depression in central nervous system, suppression of pain sensation and relief from anxiety
  • possible collapsed veins and infections such as hepatitis, endocarditis, or HIV/AIDS due to needle infection transmission
  • irregular heartbeat and breathing
  • drowsiness which may progress to coma and death depending on dose
  • possibility of severe health consequences depending on the inert chemicals with which the heroin is combined

Drug and/or alcohol abuse counseling referrals

Students who are seeking assistance for drug and/or alcohol abuse problems should contact Maureen Conlon, Counselor/Director of Advising, at (410) 827-5856 or mconlon@chesapeake.edu. The college offers referral services to assist students attempting to address drug and/or alcohol abuse problems.